Sentences of Enduring Value: Appeal to Authority edition

All else equal, we may each prefer to do what is right, but when all else is not equal we often allow other considerations to weigh against morality. After all, morality is only one of the many ends we pursue. Yes we want to be moral, but we also want other things, and we each choose as if we often care about those other things more than morality.

Robin Hanson (uber-economist)

Sounds familiar, no?

2 thoughts on “Sentences of Enduring Value: Appeal to Authority edition”

  1. >> “(uber-economist)”

    ???
    Don’t lose your head simply because he agrees with you. 😉

    In any case, this doesn’t change the fact that, playing by its rules, there’s no place in moral rules for justification, after a certain point. An “ought” can justify another “ought”, but at some point all justifications must come to an end. At that point, you simply “ought”, beyond consequences or other considerations. In that sense, asking “and what if I don’t?” is an illegal move in the game of morality.

  2. “In that sense, asking “and what if I don’t?” is an illegal move in the game of morality.”

    Interesting point. Does that make it immoral (or amoral) to take a moral action if one’s primary motivation is personal gain?

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